Medical College receives grants for leukemia research, more

The Medical College of Wisconsin has recently received several grants to study such topics as chronic myeloid leukemia, type 1 diabetes and more. Below is a rundown of the grants.

  • MCW received a five-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute to investigate the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in treating chronic myeloid leukemia, a type of cancer starting in the blood-forming cells of the bone marrow. It is estimated that about 6,000 cases of CML will emerge in the United States in 2014, resulting in 800 deaths.
  • A collaborative team of researchers from BloodCenter of Wisconsin and MCW has received a one-year, $50,000 grant from the Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeast Wisconsin to study the effects of platelet transfusion on newborns whose medical conditions require the procedure.
  • A collaborative team of researchers from MCW and the Milwaukee School of Engineering has received a one-year, $50,000 grant from the Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeast Wisconsin to study possible interventions to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes. T1D is a lifelong disease in which the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells are largely destroyed, disabling patients’ ability to regulate blood sugar.
  • MCW has received a five-year, $500,000 training grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to investigate the development of a tool to interpret the genetic data of humans affected with cardiovascular disease. The tool will allow for an improved understanding of how to diagnose and treat cardiovascular disease.
  • MCW has received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences to advance the understanding of how endotoxin, a major component of disease-causing bacteria, is transported within the cell. Understanding the proteins and interactions involved in the transportation may give insights into how to combat potentially deadly disease-causing bacteria. 

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