Marquette Law Poll: Clinton gains on Trump in Wisconsin

Feingold widens margin over Johnson

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gained on Republican candidate Donald Trump among Wisconsin voters this month, according to the Marquette University Law School Poll released today.

The latest poll was conducted from Aug. 4 to 7, and included 805 registered voters, half of whom were surveyed by landline and half by cell phone. Asked of their political leanings, 44 percent of respondents were Republicans, while 47 percent were Democrats.

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Among likely voters, Clinton had 52 of respondents’ support, while Trump had 37 percent and 10 percent said they wouldn’t vote for either or didn’t know. Clinton gained on Trump in August, up from 45 percent in July, versus Trump’s 41 percent last month.

Of all registered voters surveyed, 46 percent supported Clinton and 36 percent supported Trump, with 16 percent saying they won’t vote for either candidate, won’t vote at all or don’t know yet. The July poll showed Clinton had 43 percent support and Trump had 37 percent among registered voters, with 18 percent in neither camp.

“There’s a noticeable shift upwards in the balance between Clinton and Trump,” said Charles Franklin, professor of law and public policy and director of the Marquette Law School Poll. “This does seem in line with the kind of margin we saw here in ’08”

But Franklin also pointed out, “The percent that don’t want to pick is still quite high.”

In the U.S. Senate race, Russ Feingold was at 49 percent, while Ron Johnson polled at 43 percent among registered voters. In July, it was Feingold 48 percent and Johnson 41 percent.

Among likely voters, it’s Feingold 53 percent, up from 49 percent last month, and Johnson 42 percent, down from 44 percent in July.

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Molly Dill, former BizTimes Milwaukee managing editor.

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